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dc.creatorCaroline Mcgregor
dc.date2019-01-26
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-23T17:17:25Z
dc.date.available2021-06-23T17:17:25Z
dc.identifierEL8/4/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/53558
dc.descriptionIn this interview, Fiona Sheldon (b. 1949) talks about her life and connections with East Lothian, particularly Garvald and Morham. Fiona’s father was a lawyer based in Haddington and, after her marriage, Fiona also joined him and worked in the family firm, McVee’s until she sold the business to Anderson and Strathearn when she turned 60. Much of this interview is related to Fiona’s public life, particularly her time on the local Community Council and her long association with Garvald Church. She described how the community has changed over time and reflects on the different communities in Garvald, Gifford and Haddington. She also explains the complex boundary system around where she lives, at Linkelee. Fiona shares her memories of several well-known local people, including Irene (Ireenie) Anderson, a Garvald resident who was a great supporter of the church and rebuilt her cottage, the Beehive, from a ruin, Alice Laurie, the artist Avril Blamire and Tom McGill. Fiona’s husband, John, has a great interest in horticulture and was instrumental in reviving the Gifford Flower show (as Fiona’s father had done in 1948). John’s working life had been as an ecologist and he was awarded an MBE for his work in derelict land reclamation, and has included completion of many successful projects in West Lothian. Other subjects covered here include changing church populations and recollections of ministers such as Cammy Mackenzie and Alastair Gray. Relating to her own working life, Fiona recalls that she was snubbed by many of her mother’s friends after she decided to return to work, when her daughter was 14 months old. She also recalls that, although the family firm took on both male and female trainees, the men would often leave after a couple of years to pursue higher wages in Edinburgh. Women, on the other hand, were more likely to want to work locally and change to part-time work as family commitments allowed. Towards the end of the interview, Fiona talks about her connections to Nunraw and the monks there and there is a discussion about the continuing importance of the monastery to life in Garvald. Fiona recalls that her father, with the help of Peter Whiston – the architect of Nunraw – managed to save the Haddington townhouse from being converted into flats. Fiona also talks about organising the Garvald nativity service, the Morham Watch-night service and the recent Armistice commemorations.
dc.format.extent1h21m49s
dc.subjectLaw
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectGifford
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectMorham
dc.subjectLinkelee house
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectLennoxlove
dc.subjectGarvald
dc.subjectNunraw
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectHaddington
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectEcology
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectOral00212224 history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleEL8-4 Fiona Sheldon
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio
dc.typeTranscription


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