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dc.creatorCaroline Mcgregor
dc.date2018-09-03
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-23T15:15:52Z
dc.date.available2021-06-23T15:15:52Z
dc.identifierEL8/2/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/53555
dc.descriptionIn this interview, husband and wife, Dougie (b. circa 1934) and Hazel Clark, talk about their connections with Garvald and their time farming at Luggate Farm. Hazel begins by sharing some of her memories of Garvald. She speaks about specific houses and how these were adapted and renovated over time. She also recalls the relationship with the monks at Nunraw, several local people, concerts and whist drives, local produce, the flood of 1948, and foraging for mushrooms. She remembered the women all going off to the Berwick fair each year and coming back with material for dresses. Many of the local women had jobs nearby e.g. domestic work, and she recalled 3 young women who cycled to work at the Kilspindle knitwear mill in Haddington every day. The mill had a shop where you could buy completed bits of knitting which you could then complete at home. Although not very pretty, Hazel said they would ‘turn the wind’. She also remembered the women of Garvald sitting outside their houses on the main street on a sunny day, knitting and chatting. Dougie then talks about his life at Luggate Farm, which his family moved to in 1944. The farm was part of the Whittinghame estate owned by Lord Balfour. He recalls an incident from primary school, when a passing plane took out the power lines and the chimney of the shop next to the school. Later in the day, the pilot came to assess the damage and brought a box of Mars bars for the children. This was during the War when chocolate was rationed. Dougie also talks about his national service, which he said were the easiest days of his life. He talks about change over time in farming, recalling how labour-intensive farming was in the past. Two POWs helped on the farm for a time and one made Dougie’s mother a lovely cigarette case as a gift (which is now part of the Haddington museum collection). He remembers the first combine harvester in Scotland came to the Whittinghame estate (and is now in the Agricultural museum at Ingliston). He also recalls Bernie Gaughan, who organised the Irish squads who came to help with the farm work and the imperative to grow potatoes which was imposed by the Executive Committee as part of the war effort. Regarding raising funds for the Welcome Home Fund, Dougie recalls how his mother dealt with the local minister, who had said he wouldn’t be giving any money to one of the farm families, whose son had been killed in action because he was Catholic. Dougie says, the minister didn’t last long after that and the family got their funds. There is then a discussion about the woodcutters from Honduras who were brought over by the government and worked nearby. Dougie and Hazel then talk about the changing fortunes of the Whittinghame Estate. The main house was built with stone brought by sea from Fife and changed hands many times over the years. At one time it was a Dr Guthrie school and then later a private school. The house has since been converted into flats. Dougie notes that the estate was entailed for a number of generations and had to be run on a shoe-string. More recently, the present owner has been able to sell off parts of the estate to make it more viable. It was said that the yew tree near the tower at the castle at Whittinghame was where Mary, Queen of Scots, met to plot the murder of Lord Darnley. Towards the end of the interview, the discussion turns again to farming and how much this has changed over Dougie’s lifetime. In his own time farming, steam-powered machines were replaced by early combine harvesters with 4 feet harvesters (which increased to 10 feet and then 16 feet). Dougie notes that current combines have harvesters of 46 feet.
dc.format.extent1h26m37s
dc.subjectReston
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectNunraw
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectEastfield
dc.subjectEstate life
dc.subjectWeaving
dc.subjectGarvald
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectLuggate farm
dc.subjectOral00212224 history
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectEast linton
dc.subjectHonduras
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectWhittinghame estate
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectPows
dc.subjectFoodways
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectTransport
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectHaddington
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectLaw
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectNational service
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.titleEL8-2 Douglas Clark and Hazel Clark
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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