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dc.creatorCaroline Mcgregor
dc.date2018-07-17
dc.date.accessioned2021-06-09T15:03:09Z
dc.date.available2021-06-09T15:03:09Z
dc.identifierEL8/1/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/53530
dc.descriptionIn this interview, Billy (William) Bell shares memories of his working life and church life, particularly in the area around Garvald and Morham. Billy was born in Hawick and spent some time working in the borders, on the Dunglass estate, before he moved to Morham Mains where he remained for many years. Billy has a long association with the churches at Garvald and Morham and he begins by speaking about the different ministers he has known over the years. In particular, he recalls Cameron Mackenzie (Cammy) who was the minister who decided not to wear official robes. Billy also notes that Sunday dress among parishioners has also become more relaxed over the years. Billy joined the kirk session and became an elder in 1989. He recalled that the first woman elder, Ireney, was appointed in 1980, only after the arrival of Ian Walker, who was less of a traditionalist than Richard Cunningham had been. Ireney, a retired head-teacher who had settled in Garvald after returning from Ghana. Billy said she was a great person who ‘shook up’ the kirk session and he recalls one instance where she rejected the Haddington kirk session practice of all the women sitting on one side of the hall (on red chairs) and the men on the other (on blue chairs) and effected a change simply by directing Billy to sit on a red chair, while she went to sit on a blue one. This discussion leads onto some conversation about other local characters, including Mrs Stitt, Dick Redpath, Mrs Laurie and Ms Turnbull. Billy then speaks about his time at Morham Mains, looking particularly at the impact of changing technology on the farm and changes in harvesting the potatoes. Latterly, most of the farm output was in potatoes, with much of the crop going first as seed potatoes to growers in the east of England, and then, later, to make crisps. Other subjects discussed include, the Highland Show which, before it settled in its permanent venue at Ingliston, used to be held in a different part of the country each year, and Billy’s love of bowling – which has led to him coaching youngsters. Towards the end of the interview, Billy talks about the monks at Nunraw and their associations with Garvald and he speaks more about his church roles, including being a commissioner at the General Assembly in Edinburgh (which he has done 4 times).
dc.format.extent56m23s
dc.subjectHighland show
dc.subjectOral00212224 history
dc.subjectGeneral assembly
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectHaddington
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectDunglass estate
dc.subjectMusselburgh
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectEdinburgh
dc.subjectReston
dc.subjectMorham mains
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectGarvald
dc.subjectGender
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectMorham
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectNunraw abbey
dc.titleEL8-1 William Bell
dc.typeAudio
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph


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