Show simple item record

dc.creatorMargaret Smith
dc.date2015-03-04
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-14T20:28:16Z
dc.date.available2021-04-14T20:28:16Z
dc.identifierDG38/17/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/53232
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Ian McIntyre (b. 1959, Kirkcudbright) about his career in nursing which was primarily at the Crichton Royal Hospital. Ian began his training at the Crichton in 1977 and he describes what life was like then, his nursing training and early impression that many of the patients he worked with in the geriatric male ward were institutionalised. By this time, the old system of communal clothing had given way to each person having their own clothes but these were kept in wardrobes outside the ward and the patients had no personal items near their bed, which were in large Nightingale wards. He could remember a time when ECT treatment was much more common and many patients were on long-term maintenance programmes which involved regular ECT treatment. Although considered beneficial in the treatment of depression Ian felt the treatment was not appropriate for many others. Ian describes how innovations in the available medications (and their effectiveness) and diagnostic criteria have enabled patients with mental health issues to have better treatment and a better quality of life. For Ian, this includes enabling people to have much more responsibility for their lives by enabling them to live in the community. Ian also felt that many people look back at the heyday of the Crichton with rose-coloured spectacles but he felt that more recent innovations, prompted not only by the available medications, but also supported by new legislation (in the form of 3 new acts being introduced to the law) and facilitated by the recruitment of new, younger staff with new expectations and skills. Ian takes a long view of change over time however, pointing out that developments to enable patients to be discharged home can be seen as far back as the 1950s at the Crichton. Ian also talks about his time at Ninewells Hospital in Dundee, where psychologist Phil Barker was doing pioneering work with CBT. Ian returned to Newton Stewart to work as a community psychiatric nurse and he talks about this time. After returning to the Crichton he became part of the service review which led, eventually, to the development of Midpark where he was project sponsor and worked alongside David Hall, the project donor and clinical director. Towards the end of the interview, Ian returns to the mid-1990s to speak about work he undertook with his colleague, Margaret Stewart, to dismantle the night-admin system which freed up funds to support the daytime service. In closing remarks, Ian says he has been proud to be involved in mental health nursing during his career and proud of Midpark, which provides care for the people who really need it.
dc.format.extent41m48s
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectDundee
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectDumfries
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.titleDG38-17 Interviews of Ian McIntyre DIP
dc.typeAudio
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph


Files in this item

Thumbnail
Thumbnail
Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record