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dc.creatorCraig Fabian
dc.creatorAlison Fabian
dc.date2018-02-09
dc.date2018-02-12
dc.date2018-02-05
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-14T01:03:42Z
dc.date.available2021-04-14T01:03:42Z
dc.identifierDG55/1/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/53182
dc.descriptionThis interview forms part of the Kirkcudbright Artists Remembered project. This project was active during the refurbishment of the Kirkcudbright Town hall into the Kirkcudbright Galleries centre and was undertaken as a partnership between the Kirkcudbright Harbour Cottage Trust and the EERC. In this interview (2 of 2), Janette Millar (b. 1938) talks more about her life in Kirkcudbright, now concentrating on her adult life and again remembering the artists that were around the town. Janette did a number of night-classes over the years, including: pottery with Tommy Lochhead, woodwork with Tim Jeffs and drawing and painting with Lena Alexander. She also talks in more detail about the artists she knew more, Miles Johnston and his wife Dorothy Johnston, who lived next door. She recalled that Miles was always very good to her children, encouraging their artistic activities. She also speaks about Tim Jeffs and recalls one occasion when he brought the actor, John Laurie, to visit. Janette also speaks about Lena Alexander, who taught at her Sunday school and who she remembers as a vivacious and outgoing person who was well cared for by the Johnston’s when she had troubles later in her life. Towards the end of the interview, Janette is asked about the development of Kirkcudbright as a tourist destination, the character of the town and her feelings about the new gallery. As a businesswoman, Janette was concerned that the gallery would be difficult to maintain without charging an entrance fee. She also said that she felt the town needed an industry which would provide real employment opportunities for young people to balance the current, ageing population.
dc.descriptionThis interview forms part of the Kirkcudbright Artists Remembered project. This project was active during the refurbishment of the Kirkcudbright Town hall into the Kirkcudbright Galleries centre and was undertaken as a partnership between the Kirkcudbright Harbour Cottage Trust and the EERC. In this interview (1 of 2), Janette Millar (b. 1938) shares memories of her life in Kirkcudbright. She talks about her early childhood, when her father was in the army and her mother was a postal worker and often had to cycle out at night, without lights because of the blackout. She recalls her schooldays and the games she played at a time when there were lots of young families living in the High Street. Often she and the other children would go into the homes of the artists who lived in the Greengate, and she remembered a number of the artists helped out with community events and taught classes at the school. Janette left school at 15 and went on to the commercial college in Castle Douglas where she learned shorthand, typing and book-keeping. She then worked with Williamson and Henry for 9 years and said she loved this varied and ineresting job. She married Gavin, an upholsterer and together they ran their business, selling furniture and collectables, until 2017. Recalling the Kirkcudbright artists, Janette said they were the hippies of their day, often dressing in black and wearing hats and she especially remembered E A Taylor, who wore a trilby style hat. Janette also reflects on how Kirkcudbright has changed over the years. Although the town looks very similar, she felt there was much less of a sense of community now. Where formerly a right of way was maintained in the back closes, increasingly these were closed off as new people take over properties and wanted more privacy. Talking about entertainment in her youth, Janette recalls the theatre companies which used to visit the town. She especially remembered Edward Woodward who returned to film The Wicker Man in Kirkcudbright and said he was a very nice man who spoke to everyone. Items from her shop, and pieces of her knitting, were hired for the filmset. Filming of 5 Red Herrings was exciting as the children had all read the book at school. Other aspects of community life recalled include dancing classes, law and order and local businesses.
dc.format.extent42m14s
dc.format.extent47m17s
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectCastle douglas
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectLaw and order
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectArt
dc.subjectEntertainment
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectPlay
dc.subjectKirkcudbright
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectThe wicker man
dc.subjectFive red herrings
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.titleDG55-1 Interviews of Janette Millar DIP
dc.typeAudio
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph


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