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dc.creatorCaroline Buck
dc.date2014-11-03
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-02T00:04:59Z
dc.date.available2021-04-02T00:04:59Z
dc.identifierDG35/5/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52656
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Dr George Gordon (b.1936, Markinch) who came to Dumfries in 1969. George begins by talking about his childhood and education in Markinch, were his father was a GP. He recalled returning home from church and his mother crying when the radio announcement declared the beginning of World War 2. He had felt drawn to medicine, which he studied at Edinburgh. After 10 years in Edinburgh, including a lengthy spell at Simpson's maternity hospital, he moved to Dumfries Royal Infirmary where he became, at 32, the youngest appointed consultant in Scotland. George also talks about the history of Cresswell maternity unit that was established by Bruce Dewar as a safe haven from wartime bombing for pregnant women from Edinburgh and Glasgow. When the imminent danger had passed and women no longer elected to come down to Dumfries Dr Dewar made a case for the Cresswell to continue which it did until around 2001. However, when the new Dumfries Royal Infirmary opened at Nithbank, which was then further away from Cresswell, practical concerns increased the pressure to integrate the maternity unit back in with the infirmary. George then goes on to talk about his association with Moat Brae, which began in 1973. He describes the range of operations carried out and speaks about the surgeons and staff, including Dr Gordon Hunter, who wore yellow gloves and a bowler hat. George also speaks about the refurbishment that was carried out in the 1980s following an appeal which was headed by the Duke of Buccleuch. As part of the refurbishment, the grey paint was removed and the sandstone frontage restored (although George notes the grey paint can still be seen at the back of the building.) This was also around the time that part of the land was sold off which allowed Barrie house to be built. The private hospital eventually closed due to perceived risk factors (although there had been no incidents) and a slowing down of patients. Towards the end of the interview, George talks about many of the personalities he knew from Moat Brae before finishing with a recitation of a eulogy he has written for Moat Brae.
dc.format.extent34m45s
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectMedicine
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectDumfries
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectNhscommunity
dc.subjectMarkinch
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectPoetry
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectPregnancy
dc.subjectEducation
dc.titleDG35-5 Interviews of George Gordon AIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typeAudio


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