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dc.creatorTania Gardner
dc.date2012-10-09
dc.date.accessioned2021-04-01T11:47:18Z
dc.date.available2021-04-01T11:47:18Z
dc.identifierDG13/4/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52609
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Felicity Gelder (aged 65) who has spent much of her life in Kirkcudbright. Felicity grew up in 83 and 81 High Street, properties that were owned by her grandmother. She describes the layout and function of the building and the garden and talks about where she used to play as a child. Two of Felicity's aunts had the Gordon House Hotel, a temperance hotel that was mainly home to travelling sales men, teachers etc. many of whom would stay for long periods of time. Felicity remembered that the family would have their Christmas dinner at the hotel which, although somewhat old fashioned to her, did have a TV. Felicity talks about life in the town and some of the characters and worthies she encountered, including: tourists and summer school painters; the Milroys, onion Johnnies; travelling sales men and courthouse activities. As a younger child, common past-times were dares around the harbour and games of tig which roamed all over town. As a teenager the family had a caravan at Sandgreen and much of their free time was spent there. Felicity also earned money helping her aunt and others with chores, going for shopping etc. and she talks about some of the shops and businesses in town. A treat would be to go to Dumfries for special shopping. There were also dances in town, or going to the cafes. After university and working in Edinburgh, Felicity and her husband, Ian, returned to Kirkcudbright when they were offered a house. She said they were both happy to return to the town and appreciated it more for being away. Towards the end of the interview she reflects on changes in the town and thinks there is more money about and she knows less people, there are more cars. But she has found it very easy to fit back into town life and remarks that when she was growing up, there was no awareness really that famous artists lived in the town; it was simply that they were there.
dc.format.extent34m11s
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectKirkcudbright
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectShopping
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSandgreen
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectEntertainment
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectShops
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectOral history
dc.titleDG13-4 Interviews of Felicity Gelder DIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio
dc.typeTranscription


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