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dc.creatorJohn Glover
dc.date2015-06-02
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-18T20:39:34Z
dc.date.available2020-10-18T20:39:34Z
dc.identifierDG49/1/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52357
dc.descriptionIn the second track (of 2) Harold speaks a bit more about his time in Jerusalem when he was in the army. He visited three times and would go to the Scots kirk, St Andrew's. He also recalled that he had visited Galilee and waded out into the water to see how Christ would have addressed the 5,000 (as it says in the bible). He was delighted to discover that the natural ampitheatre created by the surrounding hillside meant that it was possible to hear his voice from even a great distance away. Harold also talks about this great love of Dumfries and Galloway and the natural landscape. Harold's son, David, has cerebral palsy and Harold reflects on the huge impact the creation of the NHS had on his treatment. He recalls that it was very difficult when David was away in hospital for extended periods and recalls that David himself was unhappy because it was mince and tatties every day except Friday, when it was fish.
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Harold Gibson (aged 98) who was born in Corsock and then moved to Dalbeattie when he was ten and a half. Harold talks about his early life at Corsock where there house had no running water or electricity. His father and brother, both tailors, had gone to Manchester to work but both contracted Tuberculosis. Harold's father came home and recovered (and lived to the age of 85), although his brother died in Manchester. As well as working as a tailor, Harold's father was also a local postman and, at the age of 53, had to learn to drive when the service became the first to be motorised. Harold wasn't very happy at school and left to become a telegraph boy at 15. He subsequently took Civil Service exams and classes and went to St Albans to do further training. He liked it there but returned to Dalbeattie to marry Elsie. Almost immediately, he was sent off to Ciaro where he remained for 4 years. He describes his time in Ciaro and his long journey home. For both Harold and Elsie, Chrichton Hospital League of Friends and their local church (St George's) have, along with their family, been of central importance in their lives. Harold talks about his time as an elder within the church and expresses his concern that young people and children are missing from the church today. He also talks about his work with the Crichton, where he held the post of both vice-chairman and chairman, and reflects on how much he enjoyed working with Allan Harvey when he was secretary of the Health Council.
dc.format.extent13m30s
dc.format.extent40m48s
dc.relationThere are 2 audio files containing the output fron one interview conducted on 02 June 2015.
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectDalbeattie
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectNature
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectTuberculosis
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectDisease
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectCorsock
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG49-1 Interviews of Harold Gibson DIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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