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dc.creatorChristopher Craig
dc.date2014-12-17
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-17T22:51:31Z
dc.date.available2020-10-17T22:51:31Z
dc.identifierDG42/4/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52317
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with William Crawford (aged 78), who is the present Laird of Dunscore, a small estate near Dumfries. William begins by relating some of the history of the estate, which was formed in 1600 having previously been part of a larger Grierson family estate. The estate was bought by William's great grandfather in 1868 and has been in the family since then. William describes his early life, including: staffing in the family home; the role of his grandmother; schooling at West Downs prep school (which was evacuated to Blair Castle during the war) and the experience of being taught by war heroes. He goes on to describe his time doing his National Service, based at Catterick. From there he went on to Emmanual College, Cambridge to study for the law and recalls going to enthralling lectures given by F R Leavis. After university he worked in Edinburgh for Shepherd and Wedderburn, writers to the Signet. One of the cases he worked on there was the divorce of the Duke and Duchess of Argyll. He then read for the English bar and went on to build up a practice in Newcastle. He describes his work there and provides details of the types of crimes prevalent at that time. He progressed through his profession and went to the bench in 1986. He was there until he retired. He describes changes over time in both criminal activity and the way in which law was practiced. He also talks about the role of the Civil Service in the law, which he sometimes found unhelpful. He talks about the challenges of running the estate whilst also following his career and commends his farm manager, George Howat, who has worked with him as farm manager since 1966. George's father was the farmer at White Dyke, the largest farm on the estate. William described how the estate had evolved over time, especially in the following areas: the move away from small farms to one large managed estate; the move from beef herd to grass; the impact of right to buy; the development of the woodlands and their purpose in farming (shelter belts); crops, harvesting and ecology and the introduction of mains water and electricity supply. Towards the end of the interview, William recalls what Dunscore village was like when he was a child. Businesses in the village then included a tailor, 2 cobblers, 2 pubs and a carpenter. Finally, he added that his son felt the yield on assets from the estate was absurdly low but William said that he felt that running a small estate was hugely enjoyable and more of a way of life than a way of raising an income.
dc.format.extent56m21s
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectDunscore estate
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectDunscore village
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSchooldays
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectLaw
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectNational service
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectEstate work
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectWhite dyke farm
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG42-4 Interviews of William Crawford DIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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