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dc.creatorTania Gardner
dc.date2014-04-03
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-12T18:59:22Z
dc.date.available2020-10-12T18:59:22Z
dc.identifierDG13/11/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52114
dc.descriptionIn this second part of the interview, Jean Anderson recalls her childhood visits to Kip House at Halloween. One year, forty plus years ago, she dressed up as a paper boy and recited a poem (which mentions many of the newspapers available at that time) as her 'party piece'. The reward would have been an apple and maybe a thruppence.
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Jean Anderson (b.1932) who was born and brought up in Kippford and now lives in Kirkcudbright. This interview looks in details at Jean's home life and subsequent career in nursing. Her family lived in Gibb's House, just outside Kippford, on a smallholding with 12 dairy cows. Jean describes the house, which included a round window at one end which was thought to be a lookout for excisemen in order to warn contraband traders on the estuary. She describes the diary work, field work and talks about the clydesdale horses on the farm and the types of tasks they were put to. Jean recalled the different vans and salesmen who came to the farm. For smaller orders, the baker or butcher, a note and money were put in a crate at the road end and then the goods were collected after the van had been round. A door-to-door man came with haberdashery while clothes shopping was done in Dalbeattie. Jean also talks about some of the wider family, including an uncle who fell out with Mrs McLellan, the wife of the laird, after she refused to allow a pub to open in Kipford. He thought the men had every right to have access to a drink, even though he was tea-total. Jean notes that he and her father, who called his bull Stalin, had Communist leanings. In her youth, Jean's mother had worked at a piano wire factory in Musselburgh (which later made wires for aircraft during World War 1). She later went to work for a rich bachelor in St Abb's and Jean relates some anecdotes about this, including the time when she was promoted from kitchen maid to house maid but warned not to scrub the Raeburn paintings as one previous maid had done. Jean's brother had gone to Canada as a youth and had only returned once, for a visit. On her 16th birthday, Jean went to Castle Douglas to begin working as a nurse. She relates anecdotes about this time and her subsequent training at Dumfries, where she got the prize for best practical nurse when she qualified. She then went on to work at the Sick Kids Hospital in Edinburgh and recalled that even then, 60 years ago, they were talking about building a new facility. Jean went on to work at the Vale of Leven and describes this state-of-the-art hospital, which was the first new hospital to be built after World War 2, and her disappointment with the more recent history of the facility.
dc.format.extent1h22m17s
dc.format.extent3m 34s
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectHalloween
dc.subjectKippford
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectWorld war 1
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSchooldays
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectSeasonal customs
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectGuising
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectNursing
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectKip house
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG13-11 Interviews of Jean Anderson AIP
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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