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dc.creatorTania Gardner
dc.date2014-04-08
dc.date2013-05-20
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-12T13:20:58Z
dc.date.available2020-10-12T13:20:58Z
dc.identifierDG13/6/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52104
dc.descriptionFollow-up interview (2/2) with Peter McAdam, which concentrates on his working life and the landscape around Kirkcudbright. Peter worked at Dundrennan Range 1946-47. During this time, the camp was being run down but still housed sixty POWs who would be collected each morning and taken to surrounding farms to work. After that, Peter joined the Central Electricity Board and worked out of the sub-station at Tongland. This company were responsible for the pylons and lines in the surrounding area. He describes in detail the different organisations who together provided electricity in the area prior to nationalisation in 1948. Topics covered include: how the organisations worked together; the location of lines and sub-stations; the snow of March 1947; the plane crash at Tarbolton in 1948; change as a result of nationalisation; local landowner and business involvement. Part of the interview is devoted to a discussion about the land use and how this changed over time. Initially, much of the land the pylons crossed would have been in private hands and used for sheep or cattle but latterly the Forestry Commission bought up large areas and planted trees. The location, maintenance and surroundings of various sub-stations are discussed, most particularly that at Tongland. Substations and pylon routes in the vicinity of Newton Stewart, Glen Luce, Dumfries, Carlisle, Kilmarnock, Dumfries are mentioned, as is the Galashiels to Carlisle line, built in 1940. Peter remarks that when this facility was opened, in 1936, the board undertook to keep the building and surroundings looking as pleasant as possible. To this end, the sub-station was frequently painted and a gardener employed to ensure the grounds were kept tidy and plants were chosen and cultivated specifically to camouflage the building. Other places discussed include Clatteringshaws (now on the Southern Upland Way) where iron-age artefacts were found in the 1960s; Kendoon (which provided housing for local electricity board workers and a hall for dances and Christmas socials) and the dark skies park (Loch Doon). Peter reflects that the service now employs far fewer people and pylons are now checked by helicopter. Issues around land access and efforts to thwart poaching are also discussed. The Galloway Motor Company is discussed and also the silk factory. Peter notes that the Mayfield Hotel was originally built to house Welsh girls who came to work at this factory. Many married local men and stayed in the area. Towards the end of the interview, Peter talks about the history of the hotel, which was subsequently bought by Mr Shakleton because his son had enjoyed his time at the nearby Keighly camp when he was a schoolboy. He also speaks about other local businesses and notes that the river around Tongland, which is now very congested with debris, used to be maintained by the electricity employees.
dc.descriptionInterview with Peter McAdam who had lived his whole life in Kirkcudbright. This biographical interview begins with Peter explaining that he was brought up by his mother after his father returned from Egypt (World War 1) but died suddenly, in 1922. Peter talks about his school life and, together with the interviewer, looks through some photographs of his classmates and also one from his mother’s schooldays. He talks about learning to swim down at the port and the unofficial football league, known as summer football, which took place in the area, at Haig's field. Teams such as the Corinthians of Kirkcudbright and Market Star of Castle Douglas are recalled. Peter also remembered, in 1930, a visit from the American Ambassador, General Dawes, who came from London to open the Cochrane Hall gymnasium. After completing their schooling, most people stayed in the local area to work. Job opportunities included apprenticeships in trades such as building and working in various shops. The Mayfield Hotel was originally built as a hostel for the Welsh girls who came to work at the silk factory at Tongland. Fishing was mostly lobster. Life and industry around the harbour are discussed. The Left hand side of Victoria Park was the site of the first council housing in town. Unfortunately, the cost of the rents was so high that only professionals could afford to live there. Other subjects covered include: the cattle being brought in by train for slaughter for the domestic market; cycling, camping at Mulloch bay, the football special train every fortnight, which was met on the return journey by those anxious to hear the football results in the days before radios were common household items. Peter was called up in 1940 and descibes some of the practicalites of moving around with troops preparing for deployment - including time spent in Stranraer as a mechanic working on the planes. He says nothing of his combat experience and remarks that following World War 2 nobody seemed to talk about this period. Towards the end of the interview he talks about the history of his family home, the Kirkcudbright artists, lodging houses, neighbours and local businesses and reflects that there are many new people in Kirkcudbright whereas before he would have known everyone.
dc.format.extent1h 7m 30s
dc.format.extent1h 28m 51s
dc.relationPeter McAdam was interviewed on two occasions by Tania Gardner. May 20 2013 and April 08 2014.
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectElectricity board
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectIndustry
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectKirkcudbright (the harbour
dc.subjectNationalisation
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectFootball
dc.subjectCraigencallie
dc.subjectTarbolton
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectVisual art
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectHaig's field
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRoman catholic
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectDundrennan range
dc.subjectWorld war 1
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectLoch doon
dc.subjectLandscape
dc.subjectPows
dc.subjectStranraer
dc.subjectMulloch bay
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectClatteringshaws
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectCochran hall gymnasium)
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectTongland
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectArchaeology
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectKendoon
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectKirkcudbright
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.titleDG13-6 Interviews of Peter McAdam AIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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