Show simple item record

dc.creatorKirsty Robertson
dc.date2012-10-02
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-06T08:51:10Z
dc.date.available2020-10-06T08:51:10Z
dc.identifierDG10/12/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52013
dc.descriptionIn this follow-up interview, Dolly Ferries talks about her father, wider family connections and her interest in local politics. Dolly's grandfather was a contractor and this provided an opportunity for her father, when he was only 14 of 15, to travel to Canada with the cattle. He worked there and served with the Army there during World War 2. He met and married Dolly's mother while in Scotland on leave and returned to the area where he settled as a shepherd and, latterly, farm manager. Dolly relates anecdotes about his shepherding life and provides lots of detail, particularly about his boots, which were made by Boyd in Ayr, lambing times and the Baldoon estate owner, John Sprott, who Dolly tells us was a good boss. At New Year John Sprott would come round with a dram, which was drunk from a horn. She relates family anecdotes, such as one about a Canadian relative who came to visit her step-grandmother and had trouble understanding her Scottish tongue. This granny said she had seen Burke and Hare and had been terrified of them. She also told ghost stories and knitted socks for gamekeepers (with a thistle band at the top) and Dolly says she was a wonderful woman. For the rest of the interview, Dolly talks about her interest in local politics. At one time she served with both the local council and the community council. She also talks about some of the many jobs she has had over the years.
dc.descriptionBiographical interview with Dolly Ferries, aged 83, who was born at North Balfern, Kirkinner where her father was a shepherd. Her earliest memory was aged around 3, when she returned from the fever hospital after having scarlet fever. The family then moved to Baltersan, from where Dolly attended school at Loudon. She remembered the visits from the school dentist and said that dental work was carried out in the classroom. From there the family moved to West Mains on the Baldoon estate, where they stayed for 15 years. Dolly describes their cottage in detail and speaks about life at Baldoon during the war. There's a lot of information here about the workings of the farm; coping with wartime shortages (or lack thereof); getting to know the servicemen and women who passed through the camp; the troop trains etc. Dolly relates several anecdotes about this time, including one about an Irish man who came and slept on their floor for some time, while he worked on building Baldoon. Dolly also speaks a lot about the domestic economy of the farm and the foodways. The family kept 3 pigs, 2 of which were sold and 1 was kept for consumption. She notes that this wasn't really allowed during wartime, but was fairly common practice. Her mother also kept hens, ducks, geese and turkeys - strictly for economic reasons. She notes that they didn't often keep turkeys because the young birds would die if they were stung by nettles. She also talks about farm workers benefits, such as coal or flour allowances. In winter, sheep were fed on turnip chippings and her father had to watch that they didn't eat too much as this would cause the stomach to explode and the sheep, now termed a braxy, would have to be buried. During wartime, it wasn't uncommon for a sheep to be declared braxy, but actually killed for consumption. Dolly also relates funny stories connected to wartime and talks about the dances they would go to at the base, where local bands and musicians provided the entertainment. After Dolly left school she went to work at West Mains and would often go to other farms on the Baldoon estate to help out. She describes the type of work she did, including working a horse, helping with the sillage, etc. She then went into service, firstly at Dalry, Kirkcudbrightshire, where she worked for the Forbes of Callendar who had a shooting lodge there. She talks about the numbers of staff there and says that she enjoyed this work, which for many afforded more luxury than at home - running water, etc. She got home for the weekend every six weeks. She then went on to Prestwick for a while, before moving on to Garlieston, Townhead. Towards the end of the interview, Dolly talks more about the farm ways, especially during the war. She talks about the sugar allowance for bees and remembers the airmen who would pop into the farm when they were supposed to be out exercising. They would often arrive as the butter was being made, and stay for a scone and butter. Before the interview ended she talks a little about the traditions surrounding her marriage.
dc.format.extent39m12s
dc.format.extent59m57s
dc.relationThere are 3 audio files containing the output from one interview, conducted on October 02 2012.
dc.subjectEntertainment
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic service
dc.subjectDalry
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectKirkinner
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectTales
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectBaltersan
dc.subjectWorld war 1
dc.subjectEmigration
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectMarriage
dc.subjectNorth balfern
dc.subjectDomestic economy
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectFoodways
dc.subjectBaldoon
dc.subjectTownhead
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectHistory
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectCustoms
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectRationing
dc.subjectLoch doon
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectNewton stewart
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectScots
dc.subjectGarlieston
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.titleDG10-12 Interviews of Dolly Ferries AIP
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typeAudio


Files in this item

Thumbnail

This item appears in the following Collection(s)

Show simple item record