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dc.creatorGlen Cooksley
dc.date2012-06-27
dc.date.accessioned2020-10-05T18:16:18Z
dc.date.available2020-10-05T18:16:18Z
dc.identifierDG9/1/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/52009
dc.descriptionIn this interview, Mr David Doughty (born 1922), with input from his wife, Cathy, who is also present describes life in Kirkcudbright around the 1930s (and later). David's grandfather had been head keeper at Monreith estate before opening a fish, game and poultry shop in the town. David had lived his whole life in the same house and he and his wife remembered a time when the town supported about 36 shops compared to 6 at the time of the interview. This interview is mainly about the business of the shop, including: rabbit trapping; the impact of the Beeching cuts and then myxomatosis on the lucrative rabbit trade; more recently, the impact of freezers; supplying poultry and fish; recruiting pickers during the bramble season and the nature of this business; poaching (which tended to be tolerated for rabbits, which everyone wanted rid of, but not for other game). Other subjects discussed include David's childhood and education in Whithorn. He felt he had a very good education but said many of the teachers were older single women who didn't appear to like small boys. David also talks about the local snowdrop trade which at one time, before the Beeching cuts, provided important casual employment for many people during the short snowdrop season. The snowdrops were bunched and then tied with an ivy leaf at the back and packed up before being sent off by train. Other subjects discussed, include local gas supplies, the arrival of electricity, sanitation, law enforcement and recreations such as music, pubs and movies. Towards the end of the interview, David talks about some of the local Whithorn characters, particularly Noah Hendry who brought the shows to Whithorn.
dc.descriptionIn this second (of 3) tracks, David completes an anecdote about a policeman from the previous track. He then touches briefly on the Town Council before returning to the subject of the law when he describes a dispute he had with a police officer and his father's concern that one had to keep on the right side of the law for the sake of the business. In this short track, David also speaks about the Horticultural Society, which has been an important aspect of town life. When asked about changes in Whithorn, David remarks that the biggest change has been in the number of incomers into Whithorn. Interestingly, David defines an incomer as someone arriving in the past 20-30 years.
dc.descriptionIn this concluding track (3 of 3), David talks more about his shop and particularly about the opportunities his business provided for local casual employment, particularly with regard to the bramble picking and preparing poultry for sale. He charts the decline in the bramble trade, which was sparked by the Beeching cuts which closed the local rail line and eventually destroyed by Robertson's decision to import pulp from Poland for their jams, rather than pay higher rates for fresh berries. David notes that casual labour like this provided important income for families during hard times. He also talks about hiring casual labour to pluck poultry, especially over the Christmas and New Year periods and changing practice in the production of the meat (battery hens and the move away from dry plucking). Towards the end of the interview, David relates an anecdote that illustrates the challenges he faced in taking over the business from his father.
dc.format.extent1h2m6s
dc.format.extent10m50
dc.format.extent12m5s
dc.relationDavid Doughty was interviewed by Glen Cooksley on 27 June 2012. The interview is represented in 3 parts, DG9/1/1/1, DG9/1/1/3 and DG9/1/1/5.
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectRailways
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSchooldays
dc.subjectTransport
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectLighting
dc.subjectLaw
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectSanitation
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectWhithorn
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectShops
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectCasual labour
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG9-1 Interviews of David Doughty AIP
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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