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dc.creatorJulia Muir-Watt
dc.date2012-06-25
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-29T20:52:32Z
dc.date.available2020-09-29T20:52:32Z
dc.identifierDG4/4/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/28208
dc.descriptionIn this second (of 3) interviews, Jessie McLean talks more about her childhood in Whithorn. She recalls the horse trading that used to happen at the top of the town and talks about the tinkers and gaun folk who came about. She remembers that life was very hard back then. She was always working and her wages were passed on to her mother to support the family. If she did get an afternoon off then she went home and worked there. Jessie says how pleased she was that Whithorn had installed a memorial plaque (commemorated in 2016) for Jack Brent (Geordie Dickie) who had been an International Brigadier in the Spanish Civil War. Jessie also talks about how the community has changed over time. When she was young, the local workforce voted the same as their employer for fear of being sacked. Her own father had been a miner and had very different political views though. He was also educated and often helped people by writing letters for them or completing official forms. Jessie also talks about the tattie holidays and picking snowdrops for the Covent Garden markets. In the past, there were more people on the land and people looked out for each other more. There was a lot of poverty, but there was also a lot of sharing. Jessie's family kept livestock and shared what they could. Towards the end of the interview, Jessie talks more about other subjects, including nicknames, religion, tramps, working at Port Yerrick mill and she recalls that the china her mum sold came in crates from Glasgow. During the interview, Jessie talks about physical punishment when she was a child. She says that she has never hit her own children and has always made sure they were well fed and got new clothes, which was very different from her own childhood.
dc.descriptionInterview (1 of 3) with Jessie McLean (b. 1916) who was born in Whithorn where she has lived all her life. Jessie was born into the Jolly family who were a large and well-known family at the top of the town. Jessie talks about her family life and the family business, as dealers. She recalls going out early in the morning, before she went to school, to go door-to-door buying rabbit and hare skins. The skins were then sent off to Glasgow to be used in clothing. The family also sold crockery and Jessie recalled going out with the horse and cart with her mother, around both the town and the countryside. Jessie left school at 14 and worked with her mother full-time before going into service. Jessie, whose husband was a Bevan boy who had come to Whithorn to work on construction of the Burrow Head camp, continued to work until she was 72. Jessie talks about her brothers and wider family and the work they did in the area. This included breaking stones at the local quarry and helping to build the Clatteringshaws dam. She also recalls a time when many people kept horses and there were a number of blacksmiths and saddlers in the local area. Jessie's family were well-off compared to many. They were the first family at the top of the town to have electricity and a flushing toilet installed and she remembers people always shared their food with those who had less than them. Jenny said it was a tough life and says that the greatest invention was the washing machine, recalling the large amount of time devoted to washing clothes in the past. Towards the end of the interview, Jessie talks about the local tramps, such as Scotch Jimmy, and remembers a time when there would be horse trading and races at the top of the town.
dc.descriptionIn this third (of 3) interview track, which is very short, Jessie reflects on her very happy life.
dc.format.extent47s
dc.format.extent1h2m6s
dc.relationThere are 3 audio files containing the output from one interview, conducted on June 25 2012. (DG4/4/1/1, DG4/4/1/3 and DG4/4/1/5).
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectHousing
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectClatteringshaws dam
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectLanguage
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectGarlieston
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectFoodways
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectTravellers
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectMonreith
dc.subjectSpanish civil war
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectWhithorn
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectSorbie
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectFamily
dc.subjectLiving conditions
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectDomestic service
dc.subjectScots
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectClothing
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG4-4 Interviews of Jessie McLean AIP
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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