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dc.creatorJulia Muir-Watt
dc.date2012-06-21
dc.date2012-06-28
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-29T20:25:10Z
dc.date.available2020-09-29T20:25:10Z
dc.identifierDG4/3/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/28097
dc.descriptionInterview (1 of 2) with Tom McCreath who was brought up at Broughton Mains farm and was a farmer all his working life. Tom begins by talking about his family connections to the area prior to them taking up Broughton Mains. His father served alongside Winston Churchill in World War 1 before returning to agricultural college. Tom recalls many aspects of home and school life during his childhood. Speaking about the declining number of people employed on the land, Tom says that his mother recalled 43 children walking to school from Reefer Park Road to Sorbie. When he was young, most of the farm work was done with horses and this meant local blacksmiths and farriers were an important part of the local economy. Tom recalls a time when men where known by the name of their farm and when the working day was long and hard and there was no question of falling behind with tasks. Mill days were especially busy and Tom could remember the excitement of the arrival of the steam-pulled steam mill which was owned co-operatively by the Whithorn farmers. He also talks about social activities such as curling, religious practice, poverty and foodways. He remembered farming being quite depressed in the 1930s and said that the creation of the Milk Marketing Board helped alleviate this. Tom recalls changing technology over time and could remember hand-sowing during the Ward and the harvesting process. He also remembered the impact of World War 2. His own farm received 12 evacuee children and 1 teacher from Glasgow but recalls they were all gone in 6 weeks. Other evacuees came and 2 stayed for 18 months. Tom describes the shops and businesses in the area which, with the exception of Newton Stewart market day (on Fridays) provided for the community. Speaking about the big estates and how the countryside has changed over time, Tom recalls that he used to make a small income from catching rabbits and selling them to Doughty's, the game dealer. He reflected that over time the number of pheasants and other game in the countryside has decreased as the number of small birds has increased. When asked about the biggest changes he has observed over time, Tom cited chemical change and technological change over the perhaps more usually cited move from horse to tractor. Concerning his thoughts on the future, Tom said that he had always been concerned about a depression in farming and this had thankfully not materialised, partly due to the UK joining the EU, so he was generally optimistic. However, he added that he was concerned that very few, if any, politicians had any real knowledge of the countryside.
dc.descriptionIn this second interview with Tom McCreath, he clarifies his position regarding the future for small towns and villages. He remarked that on reflection he was perhaps overly optimistic about the future. He reflects that for people in their 70s and 80s now, the trend throughout their lives has been one of improvement with, for example, grants to provide inside bathrooms or county water supplies. More recently, retirees moving to the area have invested their money in their homes and so provided work for local tradespeople. However, alongside this, many homes are second homes or holiday lets, the provision of free bus passes means that more people travel out of the area for shopping and there is a large influx of people who are completely new to the area. This can lead to a loss of social cohesion which is a concern. Whilst farm wages have steadily increased and post-war improvements in social and health care are a great benefit Tom felt that people are now more vulnerable than before if there were to be a more widespread financial crisis.
dc.format.extent1h18m14s
dc.format.extent9m49s
dc.relationTom McCreath was interviewed on two occaisions by Julia Muir Watt. 21 June 2012 (DG4/3/1/1) and 28 June 2012 (DG4/3/1/3).
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectGalloway house
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectStanwick farm
dc.subjectReligion
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectWorld war 1
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectGarlieston
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectFoodways
dc.subjectTransport
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWigtown
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectWhithorn
dc.subjectBroughton mains
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectShops
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectSorbie
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectChalloch farm
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectBurrow head camp
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectFarming
dc.subjectSocial organisation
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG4-3 Interviews of Tom McCreath AIP
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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