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dc.creatorMairi Telford-Jammeh
dc.date2012-05-17
dc.date.accessioned2020-09-28T14:02:03Z
dc.date.available2020-09-28T14:02:03Z
dc.identifierDG3/2/1/1
dc.identifier.urihttps://hdl.handle.net/20.500.12734/20428
dc.descriptionFirst interview with Willie and Isa Friell, the aunt and uncle of the interviewer. Both were born in 1919 and Isa is from the 'auld toon' and Willie the 'new toun'. The interviewer proposes that the focus of this session should be on the pre-1945 years and in this wide-ranging and detailed interview Isa and Willie reflect on many aspects of their childhood and early adulthood. Subjects discussed include: watching the animals coming down the drove road on their way to market; early schooldays, the journey to school and playground games; recreation outside school; Langholm shops; life at home - including meals, lighting and heat; local community and awareness of the impact of World War 1. The relationship between the old toun community and the new toun commuity is discussed at various points and Isa notes that even at school the spelling bee teams would be the old toun against the new toun. In local customs the Easter celebrations were held at Lamb's hill (for the new toun) and up by Beck's burn (for the auld toon). Both Isa and Willie remembered skating up by Beck's farm, where there the curling club met and had a hut. Skates were hard to come by and often would be hand-made wooden blades attached to ordinary (adapted) footwear. They both rememered the summers as being longer and the winters colder when they were young. Willie talks about his father, who had been a postman with a 15-mile route (on foot) 6 days out of 7. He also describes his own first job, as a telegram delivery boy. He was always keen on cycling and talks about participating in races at the Langholm Common Riding celebrations. Isa's family were joiners and built the Langholm grandstand each year where one of Isa's jobs was to locate the holes in the field into which the grandstand posts would be hammered annually. Isa's father was recruited to help with maintaining the wooden aircrafts used in World War 1 while Willie's father had been in France during World War 1, with the Royal Horse Artillary. Towards the end of the interview, Mairi asks them for their happiest memories of Langholm: for Isa this was participating in dancing competitions with the brownies and for Willie it was being out on his bike, which he loved.
dc.descriptionIn this follow up interview with Willie and Isa, the focus is on the war years and their working lives. After training in book-keeping, shorthand and typing Isa worked in a couple of places in Langholm before moving to Arthur Bell Tweeds where she worked throughout World War 2. Isa notes that the mill was mostly producing khaki during this time and that women were drafted in to do this war work. Willie was working at the post office when, on 1 September 1939 he was told to report to the drill hall and sent off to Dumfries and then South Queensferry. In South Queensferry he witnessed the first UK air raid, when the German bombers tried to blow up the Forth bridge. During the war years, Langholm was home to many troops and evacuees and Isa talks about this. Dances were popular and the army band were often invited along to play. In 1943, Willie and Isa married in Langholm and honeymooned in Edinburgh. When Willie returned from the war they eventually secured a prefab (one of a batch built for returning servicemen) which, they remembered, was very cold due to the central heating not working. They moved on to a bigger house before buying a home. There is a discussion about having a baby pre-NHS and they note that the cost fo treatment at this time was £14.00. The next section of the interview is concerned with their time away from Langholm, 22 years, as Willie moved up the ladder in the post office. They retired in 1981, took a year travelling about, and then moved back to Langholm in 1982. They immediately became involved with the community, including the church, Scottish country dancing, garden shows and the community council. Reflecting on how Langholm had changed over the years they both felt the town was a lot quieter as a result of the mills closing and people being able to travel outside the town for work. Whilst acknowledging that many of their contemporaries have passed on, they were also able to name many families who had been in the town for generations.
dc.format.extent44m44s
dc.format.extent41m53s
dc.relationThere are 2 audio files containing the output from one interview, conducted on May 17 2012. (DG3/2/1/1 and DG3/2/1/3)
dc.subjectLangholm
dc.subjectMaterial culture
dc.subjectCycling
dc.subjectTravel and transport
dc.subjectTales and anecdotes
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectCustom
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectSocial history
dc.subjectWorld war 1
dc.subjectLamb hill
dc.subjectSport
dc.subjectAgriculture
dc.subjectChildren's games
dc.subjectEducation
dc.subjectBusiness
dc.subjectOral history
dc.subjectCustom and belief
dc.subjectAudio recordings
dc.subjectSchooldays
dc.subjectHealth
dc.subjectWar
dc.subjectMovement
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectFieldwork
dc.subjectRecreation
dc.subjectCommon riding
dc.subjectArts and crafts
dc.subjectDomestic life
dc.subjectLifecycle
dc.subjectEthnology
dc.subjectCurling
dc.subjectShops and businesses
dc.subjectWorld war 2
dc.subjectCommunity
dc.subjectTradition
dc.subjectBeck's farm
dc.subjectScots
dc.subjectWorking life
dc.subjectEaster
dc.subjectChildhood
dc.subjectBiography
dc.subjectHistory
dc.titleDG3-2 Interviews of Willie and Isa Friell DIP
dc.typeTranscription
dc.typePhotograph
dc.typeAudio


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